Areas of Focus

Demographic disparities

Many workers in the US experience limited opportunities and are over- or underrepresented in certain kinds of jobs because of occupational segregation and discrimination.
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Economic context

People’s access to opportunity and advancement in the labor market is shaped by macroeconomic forces, technological change, policy choices, and labor market dynamics.
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Employer practices

Employer practices such as hiring, scheduling, promotion, supervision, and on-the-job training determine workers’ day-to-day reality and long-term prospects in the labor market.
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Federal policy

The federal government has a significant influence on shaping workers’ economic mobility and security.
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Financial stability

Savings, asset-building, and access to credit play a significant role in driving upward economic mobility, particularly across generations.
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Geographic disparities

Where people live can expand or limit their economic mobility. And labor market conditions vary considerably by locality.
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Job search and matching

How people search for and match to jobs reflects how well the labor market is functioning for both workers and employers.
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Skills and training

Human capital development—or people’s ability to acquire skills and knowledge through education and training—advances workers’ economic opportunity and strengthens employers and the economy.
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Small businesses

Small businesses employ a significant share of the workforce and have been engines of wealth and prosperity, particularly for communities of color.
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Stakeholder voices

WorkRise engages a diverse group of stakeholders to inform our strategy and carry out our mission of rebuilding a more equitable labor market so that all workers have access to opportunity and upward mobility.
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State and local policy

States and localities shape workers’ economic mobility and security through a number of channels.
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Supportive services

Social factors outside of work have profound effects on people’s ability to navigate and achieve upward mobility in the labor market.
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Wages and employer-provided benefits

Wages and employer-provided benefits such as health insurance, paid leave, and retirement savings are fundamental components of job quality.
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Worker voice, representation, and power

Unions, collective bargaining, and other forms of advocacy have resulted in better wages, benefits, and working conditions for workers.
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