Overview

Social factors outside of work have profound effects on people’s ability to navigate and achieve upward mobility in the labor market. Family caregiving responsibilities, poor physical and mental health, a lack of reliable transportation, and food and housing insecurity can limit workers’ opportunities for mobility if supports such as child care, health care, coaching, transportation, and food and housing assistance aren’t in place.

Working Knowledge

Federal policy June 28, 2022

Roe v. Wade’s Reversal Poses a Disproportionate Threat to Black Women’s Economic Mobility

The June 24 US Supreme Court ruling, which struck down the constitutional right to an abortion, will undermine Black women’s educational attainment, occupational outcomes, and lifetime earnings.

Elisabeth Jacobs, Andrew Boardman, Archana Pyati

Supportive services March 15, 2022

What Happens If We Make Child Care Assistance Available to More Parents in Education and Training?

Reducing restrictions in the public child care subsidy program would allow more parents to receive assistance to go back to school, enabling them to complete a credential, raise their earnings, and reduce child poverty.

Gina Adams, Linda Giannarelli

Skills and training September 02, 2021

Building Evidence on Occupational Identity Could Lead to New Approaches for Improving Labor Market Outcomes for Young People

Understanding how young adults form and mediate occupational identity could inform strategies to improve labor market outcomes.

Maalik Nickerson

Stakeholder voices December 30, 2020

Supporting Workers and Families through a Pandemic: A Q&A with David Zammiello

Project QUEST's executive director reflects on his organization's pivot to providing intensive coaching, mentoring, and other wraparound services entirely online.

Elisabeth Jacobs

Research

Supportive services March 15, 2022

Expanding Child Care Subsidies to Parents in Education and Training

A fact sheet summarizes findings from a new WorkRise report that models a hypothetical policy scenario where more parents in education and training were eligible for and received public child care subsidies.

Gina Adams, Linda Giannarelli, Nathan Sick, Kelly Dwyer

Supportive services March 15, 2022

Implications of Providing Child Care Assistance to Parents In Education and Training

New WorkRise research uses microsimulation to model a hypothetical policy scenario where more parents in education and training were eligible for and received public child care subsidies.

Gina Adams, Linda Giannarelli, Nathan Sick, Kelly Dwyer